This week I finished reading The 60 Minute Father by Rob Parsons (2002 edition). I’m not sure who gave it to me or where I picked it up ... but I really enjoyed the reading.  There are others in the series for Moms, so don't panic! :) I recommend the book -- however my recommendation must come with this warning ... there are tongs of great principles, but they are all wrapped up in "guilt trip" stories.  Now that I got that off my chest, I can assure you that it is worth the 60 minutes or so it takes you to read it.  I chose to break up the reading over the course of a couple of weeks.  As I reflected on each lesson and let it soak in, it helped me to really "own" each one. This book isn’t for any particular “age” or “stage” of dad ... there’s lots of practical advice for brand new dads (like me!) and dads with older children.  Here are a handful of quotes  that were among my favorites: The greatest illusion of all is that there is a slower day coming. Children love receiving letters - any chance you get, drop them a line in the mail. No one was ever heard to say on their deathbed, “I wish I had spent more time at the office.” If we listen to our kids when they are 5, 6, & 7 ... they may listen to us when they are 15, 16, & 17. Kneel to talk to toddlers and listen with your EYES. Don’t tell me how long you work - tell me what you get done. When communicating with children, you have to put in a lot of QUANTITY time in order to see QUALITY time really happen.

This week I finished reading The 60 Minute Father by Rob Parsons (2002 edition). I’m not sure who gave it to me or where I picked it up ... but I really enjoyed the reading.  There are others in the series for Moms, so don't panic! :)

I recommend the book -- however my recommendation must come with this warning ... there are tongs of great principles, but they are all wrapped up in "guilt trip" stories. 

Now that I got that off my chest, I can assure you that it is worth the 60 minutes or so it takes you to read it.  I chose to break up the reading over the course of a couple of weeks.  As I reflected on each lesson and let it soak in, it helped me to really "own" each one.

This book isn’t for any particular “age” or “stage” of dad ... there’s lots of practical advice for brand new dads (like me!) and dads with older children.  Here are a handful of quotes  that were among my favorites:


The greatest illusion of all is that there is a slower day coming.

Children love receiving letters - any chance you get, drop them a line in the mail.

No one was ever heard to say on their deathbed, “I wish I had spent more time at the office.”

If we listen to our kids when they are 5, 6, & 7 ... they may listen to us when they are 15, 16, & 17.

Kneel to talk to toddlers and listen with your EYES.

Don’t tell me how long you work - tell me what you get done.

When communicating with children, you have to put in a lot of QUANTITY time in order to see QUALITY time really happen.

Comment