Book Review: The Final Summit: A Quest to Find the One Principle That Will Save Humanity (Andy Andrews) Andy Andrews continues the story of David Ponder with this latest book.  I was not sure if I would be able to just jump in without reading the first David Ponder book "The Traveler's Gift" but within the first couple of chapters, events lead the main character to review and summarize the seven decisions for personal success that he learned in the first book.  I was able to catch up on the backstory and get an idea about the info from the first book without actually reading it.  Andrews does a wonderful job with the historical fiction conversations that happen between the different characters that span hundreds of years.  As in his previous book, there are several main characters (from King David (in the Bible) to Winston Churchill to Joan of Arc to George Washington Carver) who interact with David Ponder ... but unlike the first book, they are all together at the same table discussing the solution to finding the one principle that will save humanity. I'm a fan of history books, but have only read a couple of historical-fiction type of books.  Others that I've read have been purely historical fiction or sci-fi related ... this was the first that I've read that was centered on Christianity.  The conversations were obviously made up, but they were fun and based on the facts that are knwn about the historical figures.  The author did his homework in order to represent each character with authenticity.  The conversations centered on virtues exemplified by each new character who enters.  The only down-side to the early conversations was the predictable way that you knew they wouldn't have a successful solution to the problem at hand.  My favorite chapter was the chapter on Character when George Washington Carver was introduced.  There were several great quotes on the importance of a life lived with character, that I've saved to hang on to as good reminders for myself.  The over-arching theme that I took away from the book was that the circumstance doesn't make the man...it is character that makes the man.  Circumstances and historical context give opportunity for that character to show or to be tested ... but "great" men and women throughout history were not greater people than others.  Their circumstances merely revealed the character that was developing inside them. In all, this book was a fun read that introduced me to some new facts about some historical figures ... and also introduced me to a couple of historical figures I've never heard of.  The message is challenging and inspiring. I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com <http://BookSneeze.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Book Review: The Final Summit: A Quest to Find the One Principle That Will Save Humanity (Andy Andrews)

Andy Andrews continues the story of David Ponder with this latest book.  I was not sure if I would be able to just jump in without reading the first David Ponder book "The Traveler's Gift" but within the first couple of chapters, events lead the main character to review and summarize the seven decisions for personal success that he learned in the first book.  I was able to catch up on the backstory and get an idea about the info from the first book without actually reading it. 

Andrews does a wonderful job with the historical fiction conversations that happen between the different characters that span hundreds of years.  As in his previous book, there are several main characters (from King David (in the Bible) to Winston Churchill to Joan of Arc to George Washington Carver) who interact with David Ponder ... but unlike the first book, they are all together at the same table discussing the solution to finding the one principle that will save humanity.

I'm a fan of history books, but have only read a couple of historical-fiction type of books.  Others that I've read have been purely historical fiction or sci-fi related ... this was the first that I've read that was centered on Christianity.  The conversations were obviously made up, but they were fun and based on the facts that are knwn about the historical figures.  The author did his homework in order to represent each character with authenticity.  The conversations centered on virtues exemplified by each new character who enters.  The only down-side to the early conversations was the predictable way that you knew they wouldn't have a successful solution to the problem at hand. 

My favorite chapter was the chapter on Character when George Washington Carver was introduced.  There were several great quotes on the importance of a life lived with character, that I've saved to hang on to as good reminders for myself.  The over-arching theme that I took away from the book was that the circumstance doesn't make the man...it is character that makes the man.  Circumstances and historical context give opportunity for that character to show or to be tested ... but "great" men and women throughout history were not greater people than others.  Their circumstances merely revealed the character that was developing inside them.

In all, this book was a fun read that introduced me to some new facts about some historical figures ... and also introduced me to a couple of historical figures I've never heard of.  The message is challenging and inspiring.

I review for BookSneeze&reg;

I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com <http://BookSneeze.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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