At CentriKid Camps we are at the beginning of our camp season when staff find out what team they are on, began to get to know teammates, and began preparing for the summer.  It is great to see everybody get excited about the summer ahead. One of the most valuable things for the summer to be successful is team unity, but it can be one of the toughest things to develop.  Here are 6 thoughts to consider about building team unity in your situation: Unity doesn’t happen by accident, it takes intention.  If it was easy, everybody would be doing it. Team unity requires everybody to be all in. Everybody comes with their different backgrounds, experience levels, or even baggage… but everyone has to be committed to the process in order to become a team. “Hanging out” doesn’t create unity as fast as working does.  Rolling up your sleeves and serving together is where some of the most unifying experiences take place.  These experiences are long-lasting and create better results than just hanging out and creating inside jokes. Vision unites.  A compelling vision is more powerful than a team name, a team color, or any catchy slogan. A compelling vision requires a leader to cast it, re-cast it, and re-cast the vision again.  Continually recasting the vision is what makes great leaders great ... and what makes great teams united. Team unity is deeper than the superficial. It is not about having the same likes and dislikes, it is about unifying around that single purpose and goal. True unity brings people together around core values instead of just general interests. It can be helpful to have a tangible reminder.  Sometimes the simplest things can be a symbol of team unity.  Find your rallying cry, your spirit stick, your memento, or nostalgic reminder.  It could be a slogan, an object, a scripture passage, or anything, really.  This isn’t a requirement, but it can be a helpful reminder as you cast vision over and over as a leader. Good luck with creating unity and finding ways to draw your teammates together.  Share other thoughts you have about how to create unity and what you've seen work in the past.

At CentriKid Camps we are at the beginning of our camp season when staff find out what team they are on, began to get to know teammates, and began preparing for the summer.  It is great to see everybody get excited about the summer ahead.

One of the most valuable things for the summer to be successful is team unity, but it can be one of the toughest things to develop.  Here are 6 thoughts to consider about building team unity in your situation:

  1. Unity doesn’t happen by accident, it takes intention.  If it was easy, everybody would be doing it.
  2. Team unity requires everybody to be all in. Everybody comes with their different backgrounds, experience levels, or even baggage… but everyone has to be committed to the process in order to become a team.
  3. “Hanging out” doesn’t create unity as fast as working does.  Rolling up your sleeves and serving together is where some of the most unifying experiences take place.  These experiences are long-lasting and create better results than just hanging out and creating inside jokes.
  4. Vision unites.  A compelling vision is more powerful than a team name, a team color, or any catchy slogan. A compelling vision requires a leader to cast it, re-cast it, and re-cast the vision again.  Continually recasting the vision is what makes great leaders great ... and what makes great teams united.
  5. Team unity is deeper than the superficial. It is not about having the same likes and dislikes, it is about unifying around that single purpose and goal. True unity brings people together around core values instead of just general interests.
  6. It can be helpful to have a tangible reminder.  Sometimes the simplest things can be a symbol of team unity.  Find your rallying cry, your spirit stick, your memento, or nostalgic reminder.  It could be a slogan, an object, a scripture passage, or anything, really.  This isn’t a requirement, but it can be a helpful reminder as you cast vision over and over as a leader.


Good luck with creating unity and finding ways to draw your teammates together.  Share other thoughts you have about how to create unity and what you've seen work in the past.

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